James A. Beaver papers, 1855-1914 (bulk 1881-1896)

1433

Collection Overview

Title:
James A. Beaver papers
Dates (Inclusive):
1855-1914
Dates (Inclusive):
1881-1896
Creator:
Beaver, James A. (James Addams)
Abstract:
James A. Beaver (James Addams), 1837-1914, was a Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, lawyer, judge, and businessman, as well as Civil War brevet brigadier general, and governor of Pennsylvania (1886-1891).
Abstract:
This collection of personal papers includes correspondence, pamphlets, circulars, and photos chiefly covering Beaver's campaigns and term as governor. It also documents his Civil War service, business enterprises, service as trustee and board president of the Pennsylvania State College, and other civic responsibilities.
Collection Number:
1433
Size:
23 Cubic feet
Location:
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the  library catalog.
Repository:
Special Collections Library. Pennsylvania State University.
Languages:
English

Biographical or Historical Note

James Addams Beaver was born on the 21st of October, 1837 and died on the 13th of February, 1914. He attended Pine Grove Academy, graduated from Washington and Jefferson College in 1856, studied law with Hugh N. McAllister of Bellefonte and was admitted to the Centre County Bar in 1859. From 1861 through 1864 he saw active service with the 45th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment. He advanced to the rank of Brevet Brigadier General, was wounded three times and lost a leg. Returning to Bellefonte he became the law partner of Hugh N. McAllister and continued as such until McAllister's death in 1873. In 1877 he was joined by J. Wesley Gephart in another law partnership, to which John M. Dale was admitted in 1887. In 1893 Gephart retired from the firm, and Beaver retired two years later. In 1865 Beaver married Mary Allison McAllister.

Beaver's important political activities began in 1880, with his attendance at the Republican National Convention as chairman of the Pennsylvania delegates. There he declined nomination as vice-president. In 1881 he was nominated for governor of Pennsylvania by the Republican party. He was defeated by the democratic candidate, Robert E. Pattinson, because the Independent Republicans split from the Regulars and nominated a separate ticket. In 1886 he was renominated for Governor and was elected, serving until January 1891. In 1893 he served one term as Councilman of Bellefonte; in 1895 he was appointed justice of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania and held that office until his death. During 1898 and 1899 he served as a member of the War Investigating Commission in Washington, D.C. Beaver's interest in the Presbyterian Church was intense throughout his life, and his connections with its work were very numerous. For forty years he was a ruling elder of the Bellefonte congregation and superintendent of the Sabbath School; he was a frequent representative of the Huntingdon Presbytery, and served as chairman of the Committee on Sustenance. He was twice moderator of the Presbyterian General Assembly; he was chairman of the Systematic Beneficence Commission and member of the Board of Foreign Missions. He gave generously and served as a fund raiser and speaker. In 1910 he was a delegate to the World Missionary Conference at Edinburgh, Scotland. He displayed the same continuous and active interest in the Y.M.C.A., in which two sons, Hugh and Gilbert, held positions. The major business enterprises, of which he was organizer or heavy investor, president or director, are the First National Bank of Bellefonte, the Centre County Banking Company; the Bellefonte Building and Loan Association, the Bellefonte Iron and Nail Works; The Buffalo Run, Bellefonte and Bald Eagle Railroad, the Sterling Coal Company, the National Heat and Power Company, the Bellefonte Land Company, the Mexican Tin Making Company. After his discharge from the army in December 1864, Beaver maintained an active interest in military organizations. He was for many years the president of the Centre County Veterans Club; from 1871 to 1877 a major general in the state militia; as governor he was commander of the National Guard. He was a member of the Gregg Post, G.A.R. and a frequent and popular speaker at G.A.R. encampments and reunions. He was a member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion and in 1906 became its commander. His official connections with The Pennsylvania State College were: Trustee, 1873-1914; president of the Board of Trustees, 1874-1882 and 1898-1914. For eighteen months, 1906-1908, he was Acting President of the college. As Governor, he was influential in building up the legislative appropriations for the college to a new high, and encouraged the establishment of a broad curriculum. His personal generosity toward the college included the Hugh McAllister Beaver Scholarship and the gift of his library in 1907.

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Collection Overview

The James Addams Beaver Collection consists of 20,000 pieces of correspondence received by James Addams Beaver. No copies of letters sent by him have been preserved, and comparatively few papers or documents, except among business correspondence. The collection does include small amounts of printed materials- circulars, clippings or pamphlets- and several hundred photographs.

The papers constituting this collection were found in July, 1946 in the old Beaver mansion at Bellefonte which was then being razed. The portion of the papers which Dr. Phillip S. Klein, associate professor of history at the Pennsylvania State College, could salvage from the premises, was presented by Thomas Beaver and Benjamin J. Gryctko, owner of the property, to the Pennsylvania State College Library. A description of the discovery and the removal of the papers by Dr. Klein can be found appended to this description. The condition in which he found the papers leaves no doubt that there was considerable damage and loss to the collection; how much, however, is difficult to estimate. Of the papers brought to the Library, cleaning, flattening, and sorting has reduced the portion not easily usable to less than five percent. A few are badly torn or dirtied or faded beyond recognition; after sorting, there remains a residue of four inches of unidentified letter pages, whose matching sheets had been lost. The most serious losses and mutilations occur after 1890, and are evident in the General Correspondence, 1891-1911, and in the Business Correspondence after 1896. Both of these groups lose continuity after 1900, which probably marks the end of systematic filing by Beaver or his secretaries.

The letters of the 1860's and 1870's, while not indicating much damage or loss, are few and frequently unrelated, and appear to be merely the fragment of a file. The main body of the collection begins with Beaver's first campaign for the governorship of Pennsylvania, 1881-1882. The fullest portion is Series 5, the correspondence received while Governor which accounts for 97 inches of the total 210 inches of the collection.

The object of this description of the Beaver papers has been to identify and restore the original filing order as maintained by Beaver, and to base this description on that order. As they came to the Library, just under half of the papers retained evidence of the original filing. Six topical files could be distinguished through the presence of partially filled cardboard letter-filing cases. The subjects so identified were: The State Hospital for the Insane at Warren; the Campaign for Governorship, 1881-1882, The Campaign for Governorship, 1885-1886; Governor's Correspondence; Congratulations on Election; Appointments to the Cabinet. The internal arrangement was alphabetical by name of the writer of the letter. The remainder of the papers were in chaotic condition, but when sorted and arranged, proved to contain the missing portions of the six original files with minor losses. The amount of restoration needed varied from a few pieces to three-quarters of a file. The papers which remained after the original files were restored were divided into topics, wherever possible on evidence of some homogenous grouping, or failing this, on the basis of expediency. The five assigned topics are: General Correspondence; Business Correspondence and Papers; The Pennsylvania State College; the Curtin Memorial Monument; Miscellaneous Letters and Papers.

With the exception of the chronological arrangement of the Business Correspondence and Papers and the Curtin Memorial Monument file, the letters in all series are arranged alphabetically by name of writer. Printed broadsides, pamphlets, etc. are filed with the correspondence if they accompanied letters, otherwise they have been placed in separate folders at the beginning of the series, and in the case of the Governor's Correspondence, at the beginning of each alphabet. Papers- the loose reports, memoranda, etc. have been similarly treated, with the exception of the Business Correspondence from which the papers have not been separated. Anonymous letters are filed under anonymous; a few letters by unidentified writers have been placed at the beginning of some series. The four inches of unidentified pages of letters have been collected together and placed at the end of the collection.

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Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Copyright Notice

Copyright is retained by the creators of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], James A. Beaver papers, HCLA 1433, Special Collections Library, Pennsylvania State University.

Acquisition Information

Gift of Thomas Beaver and Benjamin J. Gryetko, 1946. Eight additional letters gifted by the estate of Margaret McDonald in 1961.

Processing Information

Processed by Special Collections staff.

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Controlled Access Headings

Genre(s)

  • Photographic
  • Scrapbooks
  • Graphic

Personal Name(s)

  • Beaver, James A. (James Addams)

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Collection Inventory

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General note

Letters received as the Republican Party candidate for governor of Pennsylvania. Beginning in August 1881, there are letters of encouragement and support; after December, pledges of delegates to the regular party conventions; following his nominations on May 10, 1882, a flood of congratulations. Until his defeat on November 6, the conduct of the campaign is the chief topic. The correspondence reflects the bitterness and animosity aroused by the action of the Independent Republicans, who, to oppose Cameron's control, named a separate ticket with John Stewart as candidate for governor. Until summer there were several attempts to harmonize the two tickets. The correspondence contains explicit directions to beaver from the Republican State Committee- Thomas V. Cooper, chairman, and George Pearson, William D. Forten, and Alexander Zelenski- on how and where to campaign; requests for personal appearances and speeches from county republican committees, many including estimates of Independent strength locally, similar requests from societies and organizations, particularly veterans' groups. From the public, party members, and friends, there are letters containing advice, opinion, and information designed to win the election. Many letters offer assistance, even the opportunity to purchase Democratic votes. Others ask favors and money. Editors request photographs and biographical materials. There are letters from his running mates Marriot Brosius, John M. Greer, William T. Davies and Williams Henry Rawle. Also, one folder of printed campaign materials. Alphabetically arranged by name of writer and indexed.

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1 1

1 2

1 3

1 4

1 5

1 6

1 7

1 8

1 9

1 10

1 11

1 12

1 13

1 14

1 15

1 16

1 17

1 18

1 28

1 29

1 30

1 19

1 20

1 21

1 22

1 23

1 24

1 25

1 26

1 27

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General note

Letters received during his second candidacy for governorship from the first mention of it in April 1885 through his nomination at Harrisburg on June 30, 1886,and up to his election on November 2. His correspondents are Republican Party members- from Thomas V. Cooper, Chairman of the Republican State Committee, down to precinct workers- friends, business leaders, organizations and groups, and the public. In content, the letters contain pre- and post-nomination promises of support, encouragement, information on the political complexion sectionally, and offers of assistance (many with requests for money attached). Many letters discuss the 1882 failure and give advice on how to campaign, others describe Beaver rallies and Beaver clubs; many contain pledges of delegates and information on the election of delegates. After June, congratulations on winning the nomination appear. There are questions from prohibitionist groups and Knights of Labor about the party platform and Beaver's intentions. In a series of seventeen letters, T.V. Cooper directed his speaking itinerary for the campaign and suggested proper content for certain campaign speeches. There are many requests for autographs. Clippings and a small amount of campaign literature are included. Alphabetically arranged by name of writer and indexed.

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1 32

1 33

1 34

1 35

1 36

1 37

1 38

1 39

1 40

1 41

1 42

1 43

1 44

1 45

1 46

1 47

1 48

1 49

1 50

1 51

1 31

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General note

Letters and telegrams conveying congratulations and good wishes on the victory from Republican Party leaders, from state and local Republican organizations, from party members individually, from friends, relatives and business associates, and from societies and groups, dating from November 2 to December 31. From T.V. Cooper, State Chairman, and from county leaders, telegrams announcing election returns are received. Many letters contain post-mortems on majorities rolled up sectionally; others request words of appreciation for "the boys." Some writers find this election a vindication for the 1882 defeat, and many express satisfaction over the discomfiture of the Independents. Popular topics for advice to the governor elect are divorce reform, prohibition, industrial education, expansion of the Soldiers Orphans Schools. A copy of the demands of the Miners and Laborers Amalgamated Association appears and an appeal for  "just weight" legislation. Recommendations for appointments to political office from M.S. Quay, T.V. Cooper, Thomas B. Cochran, and others convey to Beaver the wishes of party leaders on various candidates. There are numerous appeals for petty patronage from all over the state. Also included are letters relating to the selection of a private secretary for the governor, invitations to attend victory celebrations, letters arranging the inaugural ceremonies (and from John W. Frazier, advice on the inaugural address), replies to invitations to the inaugural, requests for money, influence and favors, and requests for speeches. Two letters from out-going Governor Robert E. Pattinson and two from ex-governor John F. Hartranft are included. Also one folder of printed materials is placed at the end of the file. Alphabetically arranged and indexed.

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2 1

2 2

2 3

2 4

2 5

2 6

2 7

2 8

2 9

2 10

2 11

2 12

2 13

2 14

2 15

2 16

2 17

2 18

2 19

2 20

2 21

2 22

2 23

2 24

2 25

2 26

2 27

2 28

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General note

Letters received during November and December relating to the selection of a Secretary of the Commonwealth, an Attorney General, and an Adjutant General for the governor's cabinet. The writers are lawyers, judges, political leaders, and prominent men of the Republican Party. In content, the letters are personal and professional testimonials, recommendations on the basis of sectional patronage, and popular petitions. The question of the eligibility of Thomas V. Cooper, candidate for Secretary of the Commonwealth while still a state senator, brought to the governor many opinions and interpretations of the pertinent state stature. A special file on the subject contains the favorable interpretation of seven Delaware County lawyers, together with responses which they received from lawyers and judges throughout the state. As a special arrangement, the series is divided according to the name of the candidate for cabinet office. Within the sixteen resulting divisions the letter are arranged alphabetically by name of the writer. The candidates were: for Secretary of the Commonwealth, Thomas V. Cooper, John M. Greer, Clinton Lloyd and Walter Lyons; for Attorney General, Benjamin Harris Brewster, Marriot Brosius, John Hay Brown, George N. Corson, Lyman D. Gilbert, Henry Williams, Robert M. Henderson, James W. Lee, John Stewart and Charles W. Stone; for Adjutant General, Thomas E. Wiedersheim and John A. Wiley. This series is indexed.

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2 30

2 47

2 44

2 36

2 50

2 29

2 43

2 49

2 32

2 40

2 41

2 46

2 37

2 38

2 39

2 31

2 42

2 48

2 33

2 34

2 35

2 45

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General note

Correspondence received as Governor of Pennsylvania, January 1887 to January 17, 1891. Personal letters, comparatively few in number, are included. The governor's correspondents include state official, cabinet members and legislators, chairman and members of commissions established during his administration, Republican Party leaders of Pennsylvania, of surrounding states, and of the nation, party members from all levels seeking political appointment, the governors of a dozen states, the President, cabinet officials and congressman of the national government. Societies, clubs and organizations, labor and farm groups, welfare societies, educational institutions, churches and affiliated groups, and military units are a few of the main groups seeking support for particular interests. Friends, relatives, and the general public are included.

In content, nearly a half of the total are letters written to secure patronage appointments in state, local or national government. A considerable number of letters by party leaders, M.S. Quay, Boies Penrose, T.V. Cooper, are devoted to the same topic. Second in number are the letters asking favors of the governor. Most often requested are letters of recommendation, letters of introduction, information, contributions, assistance with was pension claims, autographs, and photographs. During the sessions of the legislature held in the first half of 1887 and of 1889, numerous letters were designed to influence the governor's decision on bills coming up for his signature. Those bills inspiring most comment were the tax revision law, which lingered throughout both sessions; the factory inspection law and the appointment of factory inspectors; the judges salary law, the proposed revision of the old fence law and the poor laws; the prohibition amendment passed at both sessions and rejected by public vote, the liquor license law, and the appropriation bills (particularly the amounts designated for state institutions). There were other high points in the tide of public comments during Beaver's administration. The situation arising when the appropriation bills for 1887 were passed and the legislature adjourned without providing necessary funds aroused the public and many wrote asking the governor to call an extra session of the legislature. The Johnstown flood on May 31, 1889, the three million dollar relief fund raised by the governor from private sources, and the action of the State Board of Health and the Adjutant General necessitated much correspondence. The cause of Patnell in Ireland was strongly urged upon the governor by many writers.

From interested individuals and groups are letters of comment on such progressive enterprises as the establishment of industrial education schools, forest conservation, the investigation of coal waste, the survey of a route for a canal between Lake Erie and the Ohio River, road and highway improvement, and considerable correspondence from commissioners appointed to investigate most of these projects. Other general types of letters received are appeals for clemency, for stays of execution and pardons, and for extradition. There are many invitations from Europe and America to attend fairs, centennials and other celebrations. The major occasions in which the governor participated were the Constitutional Centennial Celebration at Philadelphia, 1887, The Centennial Celebration of Washington's Inauguration, New York, 1889, and the Centennial Exposition of the Ohio Valley and the Central States, 1888. There are also unceasing invitations for Beaver to speak at public ceremonies, meetings and social affairs- particularly from the Presbyterian Church, the YMCA, Republican clubs, and schools and colleges. Beaver also made speaking tours during the election campaigns of 1888 and 1890. Congratulations and comments on the governor's public appearances and addresses are numerous, particularly his inaugural address and his two messages to the legislature, his address of welcome to the Confederate soldiers at the Gettysburg reunion in July 1889, his participation in the inaugural parade for President Harrison, his dedication of the Pennsylvania monuments at Gettysburg, 1889. Letters relating to those institutions and organizations of which Beaver was a member, a trustee or an official appear frequently. Some of the major ones are: The Constitutional Defense League, the American Protective Tariff League, the Pennsylvania Forestry Association, the Southern State Forestry Association, the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, The Pennsylvania State College (see also Series 8), the University of Pennsylvania, Washington and Jefferson College, the Pennsylvania Military Academy, the Pennsylvania Museum, the School of Industrial Arts at Philadelphia, the New York Agricultural Experiment Station, the YMCA, the Presbyterian Church, the Sons of the Revolution, the Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Association, the Pennsylvania Prison Society, the George B. McClellan Memorial Association, Lincoln and Temple Universities, the Soldiers Orphans Schools, the Pennsylvania German Society, Princeton Theological Seminary, the Union League and Art Clubs of Philadelphia, and the Bellefonte Academy.

Twelve chronological divisions of the file, each with a separate alphabet have been maintained from the original filing scheme. The period of time covered by each division and the symbol used to indicate it in the index are as follows: January to March 1887 (A); April to June 1887 (B); July to November 1887 (C); December 1887 to March 1888 (D); April to June 1888 (E); July to November 1888 (F); December 1888 to February 1889 (G); March to April 1889 (H); May to July 1889 (I); August to December 1889 (J); January to May 1890 (K); June 1890 to January 1891 (L). The papers are arranged alphabetically by name of writer in each of the twelve divisions and the whole is indexed.

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2 54

3 14

4 4

5 2

5 29

6 2

6 28

7 2

7 31

8 18

9 2

6 3

6 29

7 3

7 32

3 15

4 5

5 30

8 19

9 3

2 55

5 3

6 4

6 30

7 4

7 33

3 16

4 6

5 31

8 20

9 4

2 56

5 4

3 17

4 7

5 5

6 5

6 31

8 21

2 57

5 32

7 34

9 5

7 5

3 18

2 58

5 33

7 35

9 6

3 19

7 6

2 59

3 20

4 8

5 6

5 34

6 6

6 32

7 7

7 36

8 22

9 7

2 60

3 21

4 9

5 7

5 35

6 7

6 33

7 8

8 23

9 8

2 61

3 22

4 10

5 8

5 36

6 8

6 34

7 9

7 37

8 24

9 9

2 62

3 23

4 11

5 9

5 37

6 9

6 35

7 10

7 38

8 25

9 10

3 24

5 38

6 10

6 36

7 39

8 26

2 63

4 12

5 10

7 11

9 11

3 25

5 39

6 11

6 37

7 40

8 27

2 64

4 13

5 11

7 12

9 12

3 26

2 65

3 27

4 14

5 12

5 40

6 12

6 38

7 13

7 41

8 28

9 13

2 66

3 28

4 15

5 13

5 41

6 13

6 39

7 14

7 42

8 29

9 14

3 1

4 16

5 14

5 42

6 14

6 40

7 15

8 1

8 30

3 29

9 15

3 30

9 16

3 2

5 15

8 2

8 31

9 17

4 17

5 43

6 15

6 41

8 32

8 3

5 16

9 18

3 31

3 32

3 3

4 18

5 44

6 16

7 17

3 33

6 42

8 33

9 19

5 26

7 16

8 4

3 34

4 19

6 17

7 18

8 5

8 34

9 20

3 4

5 17

5 45

6 43

3 35

4 20

6 18

7 19

8 6

8 35

9 21

3 36

7 20

9 22

4 3

8 7

3 37

8 8

7 21

9 23

3 5

4 21

5 18

5 46

6 19

6 44

8 36

3 6

3 38

4 22

5 19

5 47

6 20

6 45

7 22

8 9

8 37

9 24

4 23

6 21

6 46

9 25

3 39

7 23

8 10

5 48

8 38

3 7

5 20

3 40

7 24

8 11

5 49

8 39

5 21

3 8

3 41

3 9

3 42

4 24

5 22

5 50

6 22

6 47

7 25

8 12

8 40

9 26

3 10

3 43

5 23

5 51

6 23

6 48

7 26

8 13

8 41

9 27

3 11

5 52

6 49

8 42

4 25

3 44

5 24

6 24

7 27

8 14

9 28

4 26

3 45

6 25

7 28

8 15

9 29

5 25

3 12

5 53

6 50

7 29

8 43

9 30

3 46

4 27

6 26

8 16

4 01-02

5 1

5 27-28

9 1

6 27

2 52-53

3 13

6 1

7 1

7 30

8 17

2 51

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General note

Letters received from friends, relatives, party officials and members, lawyers, judges and the public from the close of his term as governor until his health declined in 1912. In content, the letters of the early 1890's, reflecting the interests of the governorship, relate to settlements of the Johnstown flood funds and to requests for influence in political appointments and action for and against pending legislation. Until his appointment as judge, Beaver remained politically active, campaigning extensively for Republican candidates. He was considered by the party for a post in the cabinet and as a candidate for the legislature. A remark attributed to Beaver and widely published- to the effect that the Democrats were not responsible for the panic of 1893- called forth angry protests and demands for retraction from party members. Beaver corresponded with friends still in office, notably Daniel H. Hastings and Charles W. Stone. After June 1895, there are numerous congratulations on his appointment to the bench of the Superior Court, and thereafter occasional letters relating to cases tried and letters from his colleagues on the bench appear. A few letters refer to his work in Washington, D.C. as a member of the War Investigating Commission, 1898-1899. Numerous letters indicate his ever increasing interest in the Presbyterian Church and the YMCA. Other organizations well represented in this file are the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, the G.A.R., Beta Theta Pi fraternity, the Union League Club, and the Pennsylvania Forestry Association. It is a completely reconstructed file and suffered losses and damage. A sharp decline is in the number of letters occurs after 1900. One folder at the end of the file contains miscellaneous letters received by Mrs. Beaver until 1925. Alphabetical arrangement within yearly divisions. Not indexed.

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9 48

10 2

10 20

10 42

9 32

10 28

10 34

10 48

10 55

9 44

9 46

10 51

10 53

10 54

11 1

11 2

11 3

11 4

11 6

11 8

11 9

9 49

10 3

10 21

10 43

9 50

10 4

10 29

10 35

9 33

10 22

10 44

9 51

10 5

10 36

9 52

10 6

10 30

10 37

9 34

10 23

9 53

10 7

10 31

10 38

9 54

10 8

10 45

9 35

9 55

10 9

10 24

10 32

10 10

10 25

10 39

10 46

9 36

9 56

9 37

10 11

11 10

9 57

10 12

9 31

9 38

10 26

10 49

10 56

10 13

9 58

10 40

10 47

9 39

10 14

10 15

9 40

9 59

10 16

9 45

10 41

10 17

9 41

9 60

9 42

10 18

11 5

11 7

9 43

9 47

10 1

10 19

10 27

10 52

10 33

10 50

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General note

Letters received and documents relating to Beaver's Bellefonte law practice, and to his business enterprises and investments. The documents consist of deeds, agreements, contracts, briefs, notes, bonds, bills, receipts, bankbooks, and cancelled checks unevenly distributed throughout the file. The papers of 1867-1869 are records which Beaver gathered as Bank Assessor in the tenth district of Pennsylvania. He supplied for tax purposes a list of stockholders of all national banks in his district. Letters and papers relating to his law practice begin in 1870 and persist until 1895, but are fragmentary. Two investments clients are well represented, however, Noah H. MacDonald, a missionary, and the estate of Abram Sussman. Most informative about the law firm are the letters from J.W. Gephart and John M. Dale to Beaver while he served as governor. Scattered throughout the file, but not numerically significant are papers relating to the residential farm, and coal properties owned by Beaver in and around Bellefonte. Beaver's earliest investments were in stocks of the First National Bank at Bellefonte, the Centre County Banking Company, the Bellefonte Building and Loan Association, and the purchase with W.T. Wylie of extensive lands near Evans, Colorado, and rights in the Evans Ditch Company (in 1872). In 1881 he founded and became President of the Bellefonte Iron and Nail Works. The increased amounts of material and number of enterprises marks 1888 as a year of great business expansion. In that year Beaver was a director of the First National Bank at Bellefonte, President of the Centre County Banking Company, President of the Buffalo Run, Bellefonte and Bald Eagle Railroad Company, a director of the Bellefonte Furnace Company. In 1889 he joined Daniel H. Hastings, then Adjutant General of Pennsylvania, in forming the Sterling Coals Company with mines in Cambria County, and was a major participant in the long and ultimately unsuccessful struggle to persuade the Pennsylvania Railroad to give reasonable rates and supply enough coal cars. At the same time he joined Hasting in an enterprise for the promotion of a gas manufacturing process invented by William Rose of Bellefonte. The National Heat and Power Company was set up with Hastings as president and Beaver as director for the purpose of attracting capital investment to develop the process. Beaver endeavored to set up a demonstration of the use of the gas in the Bellefonte Iron and Nail Works. In 1890 Beaver became president of the Blubaker Coal Company and Hastings became secretary-treasurer. About this time Beaver invested with Frank E. Bond in an orange grove in Florida. He sent George Pearson to investigate investment possibilities at Gray's Harbor, Tacoma, Washington, terminal of a projected railroad line.

In December 1891 the Bellefonte Iron and Nail Works failed and was conveyed to the Commonwealth Guarantee and Trust Company at Harrisburg for the benefit of creditors, with the provision that the property be kept intact for three years. While the Sterling Coal Company had varying fortunes, the National Heat and Power Company had to reform into the National Heat and Power Construction Company in1894 and all reference to it ceases by 1896. From their purchase, the Colorado lands suffered complicated debt encumbrances because of Wylie's default. For years they remained a subject of litigation and many plans were projected in the hope of realizing a profit on irrigated crops. From 1894 to 1897 it is the chief topic in the file because of the enterprise of W.E. Tustin, who became promoter for the lands. He reformed the Bellefonte Land Company and sought capital for the construction of a new ditch. The result was more intense litigation and a series of financial crises, and by 1897 complete disaster. Beaver speculated and gathered funds for other Tustin enterprises- one in coal lands in Pennsylvania, another in the Mexican Tin Mining Company- for which they sent an agent to sell shares in England. Also in this period Beaver invested small amounts in a silver mine at Kingston, New Mexico, which was worked by an old friend, Clarence T. Barr. From 1897 to 1900 the letters and papers are chiefly concerned with the sale of the Iron and Nail Works and other of Beaver's properties by the Commonwealth Guarantee Trust Company. In 1903 John M. Dale joined William T. Coad in a silver mining venture in Omaha, Nebraska. Beaver's name does not appear, but he was an interested party. The venture failed in 1904. After 1904 the number of papers declines sharply and the letters practically cease. By 1912 there are only three pieces for the year. Chronological arrangement, not indexed.

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11 21

13 19

11 11

11 12

11 13

11 14

11 15

11 16

11 17

11 18

11 19

11 20

11 22

11 23

11 24-27

11 29-32

11 33-36

12 01-04

12 05-08

12 09-12

12 13-16

12 17-20

12 21-32

12 33-44

13 01-12

13 13-16

13 17-18

13 20-23

13 24-25

13 26

13 27-30

13 31

13 32

13 33

13 34

13 35

13 36

13 37

13 38

13 39

11 28

11 37

13 40-41

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General note

All correspondence of PSC interest before 1891 remains as originally filed in Series 2,3.

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14 4

14 5

14 6

14 7

14 8

14 9

14 10

14 11

14 12

14 13

14 14

14 15

14 1

14 2

14 3

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14 22

14 23

14 17

14 18-21

14 24

14 16

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14 37

14 35

14 39

14 34

14 26

14 28

14 29

14 30

14 31

14 27

14 32

14 33

14 36

14 38

14 40

14 25

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151

152

1516

1521

1519

1518

1520

Acquisition Information

These letters and two others were gifted by Margaret McDonald in 1961. The two other letters were filed into the Campaign for Governorship series (Ba-Bl, "letter to brother"), and General Correspondence (letter to brother, by R.A. McDonald).

1515

1517

156

1510-14

154

155

157
Box

16
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159

158

153

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17 12

17 13-14

17 15

19 1

18 206

20 7

18 13

20 13

20 36

18 34

22 26 a & b

17 6

17 46

21 11

17 18

22 38

21 38

20 9

20 48

20 49

20 55

24 2

18 153

21 52

21 33