William Warren Scranton papers, 1933-2005

1774

Collection Overview

Title:
William Warren Scranton papers
Dates (Inclusive):
1933-2005 (bulk 1952-1989)
Dates (Inclusive):
1952-1989
Creator:
Scranton, William Warren
Abstract:
William Warren Scranton was a businessman and civic leader in Scranton, Pa., special assistant to Secretary of State, 1958-1960; Congressman from 10th Pennsylvania House district, 1960-1962; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1963-1967; candidate for Republican Party nomination for President of U.S., 1964; and diplomat and policy advisor.
Abstract:
The collection consists of correspondence, reports, tape recordings, and typescripts of speeches, press releases, drafts and final copies of publications, photographs, moving image recordings, newspaper clippings, and scrapbooks mostly about Scranton's Public Service during the 1960s and 1970s.
Collection Number:
1774
Size:
176.31 Cubic feet
Size:
104 items
Location:
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the  library catalog.
Repository:
Special Collections Library. Pennsylvania State University.
Languages:
English

Biographical Note

William Warren Scranton was born on July 19, 1917, in Madison, Connecticut. His ancestors were New England colonial settlers, founders of Scranton, Pennsylvania, and prominent Pennsylvania businessmen with interests in iron and coal--the Lackawanna Iron and Coal Company--as well as utililities, and banking. The family were early Republican Party supporters and elected representatives. He attended private day school, preparatory schools in New England, and Yale University, receiving a B.A. in 1939. He entered Yale Law School in 1939, and completed his law training after World War II. Scranton enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1941 and served from 1942 to 1945 as an Air Transport Command pilot in the South Atlantic area and Africa.

During the war he married Mary Lowe Chamberlin. He returned to Yale Law School in 1945 and graduated in 1946. Through a partnership with a Scranton city law firm and through his family's business interests, Scranton became active in the northeastern Pennsylvania business community. He first worked with the International Textbook Company, a client of his law firm. Between 1947 and 1957 he served as an executive and director with many concerns in manufacturing, coal mining, railroads, banking, and broadcasting. During these years he also assumed leadership of community civic organizations and charities. Scranton entered public service in 1959 as President Dwight D. Eisenhower's appointee to the Office of Special Assistant to the Secretary of State. Scranton served Secretaries of State John Foster Dulles and Christian Herter by providing background briefings, managing the Secretary's office, and making arrangements for diplomatic meetings and conferences.

In 1960, Scranton ran as a Republican for the U.S. House of Representatives in the Tenth Pennsylvania District, defeating the Democratic incumbent, Stanley Prokop. In Congress, Scranton joined the House Banking and Currency Committee. He supported legislation to aid chronically depressed areas, to fund public works projects, to establish the Peace Corps, and to promote mining area reclamation. During his term in Congress he described himself as internationalist in foreign affairs, conservative fiscally, and liberal in domestic and social programs. In the final months of his term as 10th district representative, Scranton campaigned for the office of Governor of Pennsylvania. He was a compromise candidate among the Republican Party factions in the state. Ray Shafer, a state senator from Meadville, teamed with Scranton as the candidate for lieutenant governor. The Republican platform outlined specific programs stressing honest government and optimism over Pennsylvania's economic future. Scranton debated his Democratic Party opponent Richardson Dilworth on television and made a strong showing. He won by a plurality of 500,000 votes in a total vote of 4.5 million.

As Governor, Scranton sponsored fiscal and constitutional reforms, congressional reapportionment, conservation, social programs, and increased support for public schools and higher education. His administration made major strides in industrial development and economic diversification, development of state parks, and conservation of land and water resources. Scranton's program was most successful in winning legislative approval in 1963 and 1964, when Republicans were the majority in both houses of the state legislature. After that time, Democrats controlled the State Assembly, with the Republicans continuing control of the Senate. Though Scranton staff members actively campaigned beginning in 1963 for his nomination as the Republican Party candidate for President, Scranton refused for months to declare his candidacy for the nomination race. The failure of other moderate Republican candidates to contest the conservative candidate, Barry Goldwater, and Goldwater's vote in the U.S. Senate against the 1964 Civil Rights Act, prompted Scranton to announce his candidacy.

When Scranton finally declared his entry in the race on June 11, 1964, there were only four weeks remaining before the Republican National Convention. Leading moderate and liberal Republicans immediately adopted Scranton as their candidate, but in cross-country campaign trips he added few delegates to the number who first supported him. He also could not persuade pledged delegates at the Republican National Convention to switch their allegiances and vote for him. Goldwater won the nomination on the first ballot. In the aftermath of his brief campaign, Scranton paid off the debts incurred during his race.

Near the end of his term as Governor of Pennsylvania, Scranton announced at a press conference that he would never again run for public office. After leaving the Governor's Office, however, Scranton continued in public life. He was appointed to several important panels and task forces. He advised political leaders in both formal and informal ways. He also accepted several diplomatic assignments that brought him back to the same arena in which he first entered public service. In addition to these activities, Scranton also took up again his business interests, leadership in Scranton community affairs, and active assistance to a number of institutions, particularly schools and universities, in which he and his family had been connected.

Scranton had sought to convene a state constitutional convention during his term as governor. This gathering was held from December 1967 to February 1968, after his successor was elected. Scranton served as a delegate to the convention and co-chaired the Judiciary and Rules Committees. Soon after the convention, President Johnson appointed Scranton to the position of vice-chair of the National Advisory Panel on Insurance in Riot-Affected Areas. This was the first of several such appointments for Scranton from 1967 to 1974, including: the Chair of the President's Commission on Campus Unrest (1970), Director of the U.S. Railway Board (1974-1975), membership on the General Advisory Committee of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (1969-1976), membership on the President's Price Commission (1971-1972), membership on President Ford's transition team for establishing a new White House staff (1974), The President's Commission on White House Fellowships (1975-1979), and the Intelligence Oversight Board (1977-1981).

Scranton's role as a diplomat after leaving elective office included serving as President-elect Nixon's special envoy to the Middle East in 1968, during which Scranton's statement advocating a "more even-handed" approach to foreign relations in that region touched off a controversy in the United States. He also represented Nixon in 1968 on a fact-finding trip to Western Europe, where he met with several heads of state. Though he turned down six requests by Presidents for ambassadorial appointments, Scranton accepted an appointment as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations by President Ford in 1976 and served until 1977.

In addition to Scranton's involvement in these public offices, he spent much of his time after 1966 pursuing business, civic, and public policy interests. He was a member of the executive board of the Tri-Lateral Commission, a member of the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education, and head of the National Municipal League, among many groups. He became a trustee of Yale University in 1967 and served several other educational institutions in a similar capacity, including the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Pittsburgh. Scranton also returned to his business interests after his term as governor. He served on the board of directors of the Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company, Mutual of New York, Bethlehem Steel, The New York Times, Cummins Engine Company, Pan American Airways, International Business Machines Corporation, Mobil, H. J. Heinz Company, Sun Oil, Scott Paper, New York Life Insurance Company, Norton Simon Corporation, Fidelity Bank, and several businesses in the Scranton area.

William W. and Mary L. Scranton have maintained their residence in the Scranton area, although they have lived in Washington, D.C. and Harrisburg and California as well. They have four children: Susan, William, Joseph, and Peter.

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Collection Overview

The William Warren Scranton Papers document a wide range of activities in private business, politics, diplomacy, education, and civic and public interest organizations. Covering mainly the years from 1952 to 1989, the correspondence, speeches, press releases, reports, publications, newspaper clippings, more than twenty-five hundred photographs and films (including 1 stored separately), 96 audio recordings, and 7 graphic items show the involvement of a respected state and national leader and dedicated public servant during a period of tumultuous change in the United States. The materials in the collection provide information on Scranton's role as a business executive and trustee, on his campaigns for election to public office, on his involvement as appointee on several public commissions, and on his performance as a special envoy of diplomatic assignments. The records of his gubernatorial administration are held at the State Archives in Harrisburg with few records at Penn State University. The papers include very few materials from Scranton's family and personal life.

The materials on Scranton's business interests fall into two fairly distinct chronological groups--those from around 1952 to 1958 and those from 1967 to 1989. In the former period, there are papers concerning mostly manufacturing firms, banking, coal mining, and broadcasting in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and the northeastern region of the state. For the latter period of time, the materials include more published financial and general information, as well as meeting agenda and minutes for several large corporations, including Bethlehem Steel, on whose boards of directors Scranton sat. Scranton's role in northeastern Pennsylvania businesses can be traced for the 1960s and 1970s in the files of Conrail, Eastern Distribution Center, and in those for the Railroad Taskforce for the Northeast Region.

Scranton's career as an elected official, Republican Party politician, presidential appointee, and diplomat is documented in a variety of materials. There are important single documents and files that highlight particular events and issues. Of special note are the information in the Congressional term and Gubernatorial papers subgroups about the legislation Scranton sponsored and supported for Pennsylvania's industrial re-development, election campaign materials, and letters from national leaders and citizens supporting and opposing his candidacies and positions. Also included are a draft of Scranton's statement to the 1964 Republican Party convention in which he conceded defeat in the race for the presidential nomination and his written statement in which he announced his retirement from elective office. Most of the newspaper clippings, photographs, tape recordings, and films in the collection also document Scranton's ceremonial duties as officeholder and his role as a national political figure. Scranton's diplomatic missions to Europe in 1968 and 1971 and the Middle East in 1968 are covered in letters and memos on U.S. relations with foreign countries, letters from world leaders, and correspondence from citizens regarding his public statements on his 1968 Mideast tour. His role as United States ambassador to the United Nations and subsequent involvement with the United Nations Association are well documented.

Materials on Scranton's involvement with public and private commissions, panels, and taskforces are largely routine, but do contain important documents in the files on the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education and the President's Commission on Campus Unrest. These include correspondence, drafts of reports, transcribed hearings, and photographs that reveal the working of the commissions, discussions of findings, and preparation of publications. Scranton's role in the President's Commission on Campus Unrest is particularly well documented. Also included is significant correspondence in the files of the Trilateral Commission and in those of the Railroad Task Force for the Northeast Region.

Of the substantial number of papers about Scranton's activity on behalf of civic and non-profit organizations, the files concerning Yale University have the fullest documentation. These show efforts in fundraising and financial management for the University, discussions of admissions policy, the proposal to merge Yale and Vassar, and a number of campus protests which involved students, faculty, administrators, and the community adjacent to the campus. The materials on other non-profit organizations are mainly meeting agenda and minutes, annual reports, financial reports, and published information. The Urban Institute files include interesting correspondence between the organization's president and Scranton concerning relations with the Nixon White House after 1972.

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Collection Arrangement

The Scranton Papers have been arranged into seventeen series on the basis both of function and format.

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Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Copyright Notice

Copyright is retained by the creators of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], William Warren Scranton papers, HCLA 1774, Special Collections Library, Pennsylvania State University.

Processing Information

Processed by Special Collections staff.

Existence and Location of Copies

Digital reproductions from this collection are available online at William Warren Scranton papers.

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Controlled Access Headings

Genre(s)

  • Graphic
  • Photographic
  • Artifacts
  • Moving Image
  • Scrapbooks
  • Audio

Personal Name(s)

  • Scranton, William Warren

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Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

Original 5 and 7 inch film reels are restricted due to fragility.

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Collection Inventory

Click associated checkboxes to select items to request. When you have finished, click the Submit Request button.

General note

The series documents Scranton's appointment and responsibilities as Special Assistant to the Secretary of State. Topics include tensions in the Caribbean area, Fidel Castro, Scranton's speaking engagements, foreign travel, Secretary of State Christian Herter, U.S. foreign policy, press relations, Africa, the International Telecommunications Satellite Consortium (INTELSAT), and the Geneva and Santiago foreign minister meetings. The series includes telegrams, clippings, notes, correspondence, memoranda, publications, and mimeographed information about foreign countries.

BoxFolder

18

19

110

111

112

113

114

115

116

117

118

119

120

11

12

14-5

16

17

13

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General note

The series consists of files from Scranton's term as representative from Pennsylvania's 10th District. These files concern election campaigns, legislation, the national and Pennsylvania Republican Party, Stanley Prokop, re-development of depressed areas, the Blue Route Highway project, and Scranton's decision to run for state-wide office. Correspondence includes copies of letters and memos from Charles Percy and Dwight D. Eisenhower [Box 2, f. 10; Box 2, f. 23]. The series includes correspondence, newsletters, speeches, mailing lists, position papers, telegrams, clippings, constituent mail, publications, job applications, and news releases.

BoxFolder

219

220

221

222

223

224

225

226

227-29

230

21

22

23

24

25

26-7

28

29

210

211

212

213

214

215

216-18

31-20

41-16

417

418

419

420

421

422

423-24

425-26

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

510

511

512

513

514

515

516

517-18

519

520

521

522

523

524

525

526

527-28

529

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

610

611

612

613

614

615

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General note

Subseries includes documents relating to voter support and campaign organization in each Pennsylvania county, as well as information about advertising, finance, platforms, Richardson Dilworth, candidates for state appointment, Scranton's inauguration as Governor, and campaign gifts and contributions. Also included are public opinion surveys and petitions supporting Scranton. A letter from Barry Goldwater [Box 9, f. 25] discusses the electoral strength of the Republican Party in the South and prospects for success in the 1964 election.

BoxFolder

71-2

73

74

75

76-7

78-9

710-11

712-13

714-15

716-17

718

719-20

721-22

723-24

725

726-27

728-29

730-31

732-33

734

735-36

737-38

739

740

741

742

743

744

745

746

747

748

749

750

751

752

753

754

755

756

757

758

759

760

761

762

763

764

765

766

767

768

81

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

810

811-13

814

815

816
BoxDrawer

817
BoxFolder

818

819

820

821

822

823

824

825

826

827

91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

910

911

912

913

914

915

916

917

918

919

920

921

922

923

924-25

926

927

928

929

930

101

102

103

104

105

106

107

108

109

1010

1011

1012

1013

1014

1015

1016

1017

1018

1019

1020

1021

1022-23

1024

1025

1026

1027

1028

1029
BoxDrawer

1030
BoxFolder

1031

1032

111

112

113

114

115

116

117

118

119

1110

1111

1112

1113

1114

1115

1116

1117

1118

1119

1120

1121

1122

1123

1124

1125

1126

1127

1128

121

122

123

124

125

126

127

128

129

1210

1211

1212

1213

1214

1215-16

1217

1218

1219

1220

1221

1222

General note

Subseries contains official versions of Scranton's speeches, recorded in transcriptions and news releases. Speeches include policy statements, commencement addresses, and ceremonial announcements, with some publications and newspaper clippings interfiled. This subseries is arranged both by subject and date.

BoxFolder

1223

1224

1225

1226

1227

1228

1229

1230

1231

1232

1233

1234

1235

1236

1237

1238

1239

1240

1241

1242

1243

1244

1245

1246

1247

1248

1249

131-2

133

134

135

136

137

138

139

1310

1311

1312

1313

1314

1315

1316

1317

1318

1319

1320

1321

1322

1323

1324

1325

1326

1327

1328

1329

1330

1331

1332

1333

1334

1335

1336

1337

1338

1339

1340

1341

1342

1343

1344

1345

1346

1347

1348

1349

1350

1351

1352

1353

1354

1355

1356

1357

1358

1359-60

141-9

1410

1411

1412

1413

1414

1415

1416

1417

1418

1419

1420

1421

151

152

153

154

155

156

157

158

159

1510

1511

1512

1513

1514

1515

1516

1517

1518

1519

1520-27

1528-29

161-2

163-4

165

166

167

168

169

1610

1611

1612

1613

1614

1615

1616

1617

1618

1619

1620

1621

1622

1623

1624

1625

1626

1627

1628

1629

1630

1631

1632

1633

1634

171

172-6

177

178

179

1710-15

1716

1717

1718

1719

1720

1721

1722

1723

1724

1725

1726

1727

1728

1729

1730

1731

1732

1733

181

182

183

184

185

186

187

188

189

1810

1811

1812

1813

1814

1815

1816

1817

1818

1819

1820

1821

1822

1823

1824-38

191-18

General note

Subseries contains letters, memoranda, telegrams, reports, position papers, news releases, publications, and political opinion surveys. Files, arranged alphabetically by subject, relate to various state topics including budgets, police, legislation, planning boards, executive departments, and suggestions from cabinet members for improving Scranton's administration. Also included are documents relating to election campaigns, the Republican Party, Scranton's Asian trip (May 16 to 25, 1966), and personal and family matters. In addition, the subseries includes information about the airplane crash that killed Pennsylvania Attorney General Walter H. Allesandroni, his wife, and two others.

BoxFolder

201

202

203-4

205

206

207-13

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

211

212

213

214

215

216

217

218-10

2111-12

2113

2114

2115

2116

2117

2118

2119

2120

221

222

223

224

225

226

227

228

229

2210

2211

2212-14

2215

2216

2217

2218-21

2222

2223

2224

231

232

233

234-9

2310

2311

2312

2313

2314

2315-16

2317

2318

2319

2320-22

2323

241

242

243

244

245-6

247

248-13

251-2

253-4

255

256-7

258

259

2510

2511

2512

2513

2514

2515

2516

2517

2518

2519

2520

2521

2522

2523-24

2525

2526

2527

2528

2529

2530

2531

2532

261

262-3

264

265-6

267

268

269

2610

2611

2612

2613

2614

271

272

273

274

275

276

277

278

279

2710