Judy Chicago art education collection, 1970-2014

9028

Collection Overview

Title:
Judy Chicago art education collection
Dates (Inclusive):
1970-2014
Creator:
Chicago, Judy, 1939-
Abstract:
Judy Chicago is a noted feminist artist, author, and educator. This collection consists of textual, photographic, graphic, and audiovisual materials related to her art pedagogical methods, including The Dinner Party Curriculum.
Collection Number:
9028
Size:
15 Linear Feet
Size:
35 Boxes
Location:
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the  library catalog.
Repository:
Special Collections Library. Pennsylvania State University.
Languages:
English

Biographical Note

Judy Chicago is a feminist artist, author, and educator best known for The Dinner Party, a multimedia art installation honoring women in history, created with the participation of hundreds of volunteers between 1974 and 1979. Other major works of art include:  the Birth Project (1980-1985),  The Holocaust Project: From Darkness to Light (1985-1993), and  Resolutions: A Stitch in Time (1994-2000).

Born Judith Sylvia Cohen in 1939, she later adopted the surname Chicago, the city of her birth, as a rejection of patriarchal naming conventions. After receiving her B.A. (1962) and M.F.A. (1964) from the University of California, Los Angeles, Chicago pioneered a feminist, content-based approach to art education through teaching positions at the California State University, Fresno (1970-1971) and the California Institute of the Arts (1971-1972). There she helped to organize and produce the ground-breaking Womanhouse installation and exhibition (1971). In addition to 'central core imagery,' Chicago's work often utilizes stereotypically 'feminine' art techniques like embroidery, ceramics, needlework, and weaving. Though her art has been exhibited internationally and received many honors, it has also been subject to ongoing debate and criticism. Even her most influential work,  The Dinner Party, did not find a permanent home until 2007, when the Brooklyn Museum made it the centerpiece of their new Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

In the late 1990s, Chicago returned to teaching with a succession of appointments at universities across the United States, often working with her husband, photographer Donald Woodman. In addition to Chicago's work as an artist and educator, she is the author of numerous books, including Institutional Time: A Critique of Studio Art Education, and two autobiographies:  Through the Flower: My Struggle as a Woman Artist (1975) and  Beyond the Flower: The Autobiography of a Feminist Artist (1996).

Chicago's non-profit organization is also called Through the Flower. Founded in 1978 to help raise funds for completing The Dinner Party, it maintains Chicago's art legacy and works to educate the public about women's achievements in art. It is based in Belen, New Mexico, where Chicago and Woodman currently reside.

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Scope and Contents

This collection consists of textual, photographic, graphic, and audiovisual materials related to Judy Chicago's art and pedagogy. This includes the records of courses taught at California State Polytechnic University, Duke University, Indiana University, Vanderbilt University, and Western Kentucky University, as well as the development of the Dinner Party companion curriculum, and a number of Chicago's writings about art and education. Although some material is dated from the early 1970s, the bulk of the collection was created between 1994 and 2013.

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Arrangement

This collection is organized into the following series.

Arrangement Outline

  1. Series I – University Teaching Residencies
  2. Subseries 1 – At Home: A Kentucky Project (WKU)
  3. Subseries 2 – Envisioning the Future (Cal State Pomona)
  4. Subseries 3 – Evoke/Invoke/Provoke (Vanderbilt University)
  5. Subseries 4 – From Theory to Practice (Duke)
  6. Subseries 5 – SINsation (Indiana University)
  7. Series II – Other Pedagogy
  8. Subseries 1 – The Dinner Party Curriculum Project
  9. Subseries 2 – Feminist Art Program (Fresno/Cal Arts)
  10. Subseries 3 – Through the Flower Summer Workshop (College of Santa Fe)
  11. Series III – Book Projects & Other Writing
  12. Subseries 1 – Frida Kahlo: Face to Face
  13. Subseries 2 – Institutional Time: A Critique of Studio Art Education
  14. Subseries 3 – Other Writing
  15. Series IV – General Files & Correspondence
  16. Series V – Art & Artifacts

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Administrative Information

Access to Collection

Collection is open for research.

Copyright Notice

Copyright is retained by the creators of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Judy Chicago Art Education collection, Collection 9028, Special Collections Library, Pennsylvania State University.

Processing Information

This collection was processed by Alyssa Carver and Special Collections staff.

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Related Materials

Related Materials

Judy Chicago's archives and artworks are held by a number of institutions, including at the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Harvard and at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Additional materials related to Judy Chicago and art education can be found on Penn State's University Park campus at the Judy Chicago Resource Suite .

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Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

Material in Boxes 30-35 is either digital or audiovisual media, and access must be mediated by Special Collections staff.

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General

Penn State University, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America have collaborated to create and maintain the Judy Chicago Portal, an online site designed to allow "each repository to consider and embrace new audiences and their collective interests in Judy Chicago's oeuvre and overall impact."

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Collection Inventory

Click associated checkboxes to select items to request. When you have finished, click the Submit Request button.

Scope and Contents

This series documents the semester-length teaching projects Chicago describes in the book Institutional Time: A Critique of Studio Art Education (2014). After a 25-year absence from teaching, Chicago returned to academia and held a series of residencies at the following institutions: Indiana University Bloomington (fall 1999), Duke University and the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (fall 2000), Western Kentucky University (fall 2001), California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (fall 2003), and Vanderbilt University (spring 2006). Each of these projects culminated in an exhibition (or several) of artworks created by students and project participants. Among these works were performances and site-specific installations that are only documented by the photographic and video material contained in this series. Other material includes: course packets, syllabi, correspondence and planning documents, promotional items, press clippings, lecture notes, and other evidence of Chicago's pedagogical methods. Because Chicago's husband, Donald Woodman, was frequently involved as co-facilitator or companion course instructor, his notes and papers are likely included here as well.

The subseries below are arranged alphabetically, by project title (or title of the project's concluding exhibition).

Scope and Contents

At Home: A Kentucky Project took place during the fall semester of 2001 at Western Kentucky University, but the resulting pair of exhibitions ran through the spring of 2002. Like  Womanhouse 30 years prior, At Home was a site-specific installation that filled an entire house with works of art created in response to the idea of "home." One part of the project, led by Woodman, documented the art-making process through photography, and in the end two exhibitions were held: a gallery show consisting of photo documentation, and the house itself with finished installations occupying every room. The house was later destroyed, but a series of exact 1:12 scale models were created by two of the  At Home project participants (John Oakes and Andee Rudloff). The replicas were exhibited as "At Home on Tour" at several locations over the following years. (See also: Series V.)

BoxFolder

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

110

111

112

113

114

115

116

117

118

119

120

121

122

123

21

22

23

24

31

32

33

41

42

43

51

52

53
Box

6
BoxFolder

71
Box

30

31

Scope and Contents

Envisioning the Future was the largest and most ambitious of the residencies conducted by Chicago and Woodman. The project was conceived as public/private partnership between the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (or Cal Poly Pomona) and the Pomona Arts Colony, with the goal of revitalizing the local arts community and engaging a community of artists across Southern California. In order to accommodate a greater number of participants, Chicago and Woodman agreed to train a set of facilitators in their style of participatory art pedagogy who would then work directly with teams of project artists. Nine facilitators led a group of more than 70 participants working in a variety of media: painting, sculpture, performance, photography, video, and installation art. In total, they created hundreds of individual works of art.  Envisioning the Future began in September 2003 with a series of lectures on art, globalization, and technology. The final exhibitions occurred between January and February of 2004, held at multiple locations throughout downtown Pomona and Claremont.

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124

125

126

127

128

129

130

131

132

133

134

135

136

137

138

139

140

141

142

143

144

111

112

113

114

115

116

117

118

119

1110

1111

1112

1113

1114

1115

1116

1117

81

82

83

84

85

86

91

92

93

94

95

96

97

101

102

103

104

105

54

55
Box

33

34

30

32

Scope and Contents

The last of Chicago's teaching residencies took place at Vanderbilt University during the spring semester of 2006, again with her husband as documentary photographer and co-facilitator. Using their content-based art pedagogy, Chicago and Woodman guided a group of students and professional artists through the creation of a large exhibition titled EVOKE/INVOKE/PROVOKE: A Multimedia Project of Discovery.

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1118

1119

1120

1121

1122

1123

1124

1125

1126

1127

1128

1129

1130

1131

1132

1133

1134

1135

1136

1137

1138

1139

121

122

123

124

125

126

127

128

129

1210

1211

1212

1213

1214

1215

1216

1217

1218

1219

1220

131

132

133

134

135

136
Box

32

31

Scope and Contents

Chicago relocated to Chapel Hill, North Carolina for the fall semester of 2000, when she held teaching appointments at both Duke University and UNC. The course at Duke was called "From Theory to Practice: A Journey of Discovery" and structured around three themes central to Chicago's own art: birth, the Holocaust, and women's history. Students were asked to engage with these subjects through research before developing art or writing in response.

BoxFolder

1140

1141

1142

1143

141

142

143

144
Box

32

31

Scope and Contents

Indiana University at Bloomington was the institution that hosted Chicago's return to teaching, 25 years after she left at CalArts. Chicago taught a project-based art course at IU during the fall of 1999, and co-taught the accompanying graduate seminar on the history of feminist art. The student art show was entitled SINsation in reference to the controversial  Sensation exhibition of British art held at the Brooklyn Museum during the same period.

BoxFolder

1144

1145

1146

1147

1148

1149

1150

145

146

147

148

149
Box

31

34

32

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Scope and Contents

This series documents teaching and pedagogical projects outside of Chicago's one-semester University residencies. Subseries below are arranged alphabetically.

Scope and Contents

The Dinner Party Curriculum Project (DPCP) differs in several ways from the other teaching projects described in this collection. It is the only one to address K-12 (elementary and high-school level) education. And like the work of art it's based upon the curriculum is a collaborative creation, involving a large number of individual participants. Though Chicago had been aware of teachers introducing the Dinner Party to their K-12 students over the years, she decided in 2006 that additional guidance and resources were necessary to help instructors succeed at this. Chicago recruited a team of education experts (many from Kutztown University) to help develop the series of lessons, activities, and example curricula eventually published online in 2009 as The Dinner Party Curriculum Project.

BoxFolder

1151

1152

1153

1154

1155

1156

151

152

153

154

155

156

157

158

159

1510

1511

1512

1513

1514

1515

1516

1517

1518

1519

1520

1521

1522

1523

1524

1525

1526

1527

1528

1529

1530

161

162

163

164

165

166

167

168

169

1610

1611

1612

1613

1614

1615

1616

1617

1618

1619

1620

1621

1622

171

172

173

174

191
Box

35

31

Scope and Contents

The influential feminist art programs Chicago helped create at Fresno State College and the California Institute of the Arts in the early 1970s are represented here by a small collection of material. There are no archival records aside from photographic documentation, mostly of Womanhouse, and a few related publications.

BoxFolder

181

182

183

184

185

1623
Box

6
BoxFolder

72

73
Box

35

34

Scope and Contents

This is a small quantity of material, primarily photographs, related to a collaborative art workshop Chicago facilitated at the College of Santa Fe, July 1994.

BoxFolder

1624

221

222

223

224

225

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Scope and Contents

Judy Chicago's writings constitute the second largest portion of this collection. Of the manuscript material, the bulk pertains to two books: a study of the artist Frida Kahlo (published 2010) and an analysis of university-level studio art education (published 2014). The subseries below, and their contents, are arranged alphabetically.

Scope and Contents

Written in collaboration with art historian Frances Borzello, Frida Kahlo: Face to Face focuses on the artist's self-portraiture and its place in the context of women's art history. It was published as a large-format illustrated edition, with more than a hundred reproductions of Kahlo's portrait work curated by Chicago and Borzello.

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1625

1626

1627

1628

1629

1630

1631

1632

1633

1634

1635

1636

1637

1638

1639

201

202

203

204

205

206

192

Scope and Contents

Institutional Time: A Critique of Studio Art Education is in part a narrative of Chicago's experience as an instructor in various higher education settings. This includes the university residencies documented in Series I of this collection. (In fact, a number of documents currently housed in this subseries may be displaced or "borrowed" from an original location in one of the folders listed above.) The manuscript was heavily revised over a period of several years, and much of the material is undated. Although most of the book's individual chapter drafts were repeatedly renumbered and rearranged, they are presented below in sequential order.

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207

208

209

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

2031

2032

2033

2034

2035

2036

2037

2038

2039

2040

2041

2042

2043

2044

211

212

213

214

215

216

217

218

219

2110

2111

2112

2113

2114

2115

2116

2117

2118

2119

2120

2121

2122

2123

2124

2125

2126

2127

2128

2129

2130

2131

2132

2133

2134

2135

2136

2137

2138

231

232

233

186
Box

35

Scope and Contents

This series contains the small amount of Chicago's writing that doesn't have an obvious place elsewhere in this collection (although some material could be related to the writing of Institutional Time). In addition to manuscript documents, there are two published works,  Beyond the Flower and  Through the Flower, both of which were regularly assigned readings for classes Chicago taught.

BoxFolder

234

235

236

237

238

239

2310

2311

2312
Box

31

35

34

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Scope and Contents

This series contains material that does not seem directly related to any of the other projects contained in this collection. It has been grouped by format and arranged alphabetically within each grouping.

BoxFolder

2313

2314

2315

2316

2317

2318

2319

2320

2321

2322

2323

2324

2325

2326

2327

2328

2329

2330

2331

2332

2333

2334

2335

2336

2337

2338

2339

226

2340

2341

2342

2343

2344

56

2345

2346

2347

2348
Box

35

35

35

34

35

35

35

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Scope and Contents

This series contains three-dimensional artifacts or otherwise unidentified works of art.

BoxFolder

2349
Box

24

25

26

27

28

29

29

29

29

29

29

29

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